Category: Indian Street Food

Kati Roll

Kati Roll
Indian Street Food

Kati Roll

A street-food dish originating from Kolkata, is wrap containing a filling of lamb enfolded in an Indian flatbread.

The Kathi Roll is perhaps the most famous street food item the city of Kolkata has produced. Invented in the first half of the 20th century its origins can actually be traced back to a single restaurant, known as Nizam’s.

Back then Kolkata was known as Calcutta, and was the capital of the British Empire in India. The story goes that the British did not want to eat kebabs with their hands, so someone at Nizam’s came up with the idea of roll the meat up in a paratha–a crispy, buttery unleavened flatbread–and then serve it in a paper wrapper.

The new snack quickly gained popularity among the masses.

The Kathi Roll derives its name from the practice of using bamboo skewers (kathi), instead of the common iron skewers, to make kebabs.

Samosa Chaat

Samosa Chaat
Indian Street Food

Samosa Chaat

From the 10th century Arab cookbooks to the royal palaces of medieval Delhi to the bustling streets of cosmopolitan India, the Samosa Chaat is a historical artefact — dish that provides delectable evidence that there is nothing new about the process of globalisation.

It is believed that people in the olden days would cook the mince-filled triangles over campfire and eat them as snacks during long journeys due to their convenience. From those humble beginnings the samosa was introduced to the courts of the Delhi Sultanate by Middle Eastern chefs. It wasn’t long before the samosa met another popular preparation — the chaat.

Chaat which means ‘to lick’, comes from the fact that the spices linger on your taste buds and you literally lick your fingers. The chaat is said to have been created for the Emperor Shah Jahan (the builder of the Taj Mahal) when he fell ill. His physician instructed him to strengthen his immunity by consuming food loaded with spice but light on the stomach. This simple panacea turned into an entire family of preparations due to its unique ability to combine with almost any other kind of food.

The samosa chaat is made with hot crushed samosas topped with cool yoghurt, a variety of chutneys finally chopped onions, assorted spices, and a multitude of savouries. The contrasting flavours, textures and temperatures is sensational and refreshing leaving you wanting more.

Tokri Chaat

Tokri Chaat
Indian Street Food

Tokri Chaat

It tastes sweet, sour, tangy and spicy — touching every point of your palate. This street food dish from Lucknow is loaded with an eclectic assortment of ingredients and is all served in an edible basket.

The historical Indian city of Lucknow maybe famously known as the ‘city of Nawabs’ but for food lovers, it is a paradise. You can dedicate everyday there trying a different category of food, and it wouldn’t be surprising to find the famous chaat dishes among the top in your list.The chaat dishes of Lucknow are highly acclaimed and among them the Tokri Chaat (also known as the basket chaat) is king.

As the name suggests, the chaat resembles a basket — delightfully crispy and used to plate the chaat. The chaat is made from a long list of ingredients including potato, lentils, chickpeas, sev, papdi and a range of spices, topped with yogurt, mint sauce, tamarind chutney and coriander.

An extremely indulgent and satisfying affair.

Momos

Momos
Indian Street Food

Momos

The ultimate comfort food, momos are steamed dumplings with a beef filling, wrapped in a dough accompanied by spicy dipping sauce.

The mom finds its origins in Tibet. It is assumed that it has it roots in the Chinese dim sum tradition similar to the Japanese gyoza. However, unlike the the extravagant dim sums of Cantonese cuisine, the mom was a peasant dish. It was made out of the cheapest, most common flour and filled with minced yak meat and flavoured with local spices.

During the Tibetan uprising of 1959, the 14th Dalai Lama and his government fled to India. Over the next decade around 80,000 Tibetan refugees made the same arduous trek over the Himalayas to India. The Tibetan diaspora spread out all across India bringing their culture and traditions with them including the delicious momo.

Easily cooked, portable and with no equipment needed other than a steamer, the Momos soon became the king of street food in India.