Category: East Indian Cuisine

Jadoh

Jadoh
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Jadoh

Jadoh is a luscious pork and wild rice delicacy of the Khasi tribal people from the eastern Indian state of Meghalaya.

n Khasi language, ‘Ja’ means rice and ‘Doh’ means means meat. Most of Khasi food involve some form of meat with vegetables generally taking a back seat. The style of cooking tends to bring out the real flavour of meat.

In fact, the Jadoh barely uses any spices with just onions, ginger, chilliest and mustard oil. Traditionally the rice is soaked in pork blood and cooked with meat, but modern versions substitute the blood with pork fat.

While it might not sound like it, the Jadoh is quite unlike other rice and meat dishes. It is quite mild and leaves you feeling light in the stomach.

Thukpa

Thukpa
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Thukpa

An extremely popular dish in the north-eastern state of Sikkim, it is a noodle soup, with assorted vegetables and derives its main flavour from ginger, garlic and the minced meain it.

Thukpa is a meaty noodle soup, which originated in the mountainous regions of Tibet and Nepal. Brought to India by Tibetan immigrants who made the arduous journey over the mountains, it is a dish they hold close to their hearts.

In those icy regions of the Himalayas, the Thukpa is credited with keeping people warm and cosy and can be enjoyed any time of the day.

Due to its sheer simplicity and nutritious value, the Thukpa has become one of the most popular dishes in Sikkim enjoyed by everyone.

Misa Mach Poora

Misa Mach Poora
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Misa Mach Poora

A delicacy from the remote Indian state of Mizoram,it is traditionally made with roasted shrimp with local spices.

Mizoram is an amalgamation of the words mi, zo and ram meaning ‘land of the hill people‘. The region is populated by tribes of the Mongolian race who came to Indian centuries ago mingling with thee cultures of China, Myanmar and British.

Very little is known about their cuisine but one of their most popular dishes is the Misa Mach Poora. While its preparation can take a long time, you can never forget the taste of this dish once you’ve tried it.

Nagapork

Nagapork
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Nagapork

A synonym of food from the east of India, the iconic Naga Pork is a masterpiece of aromas and taste. It is pork cooked with dry bamboo shoots the hottest chilli in the world —the Naga Chilli.

The Nagapork is flavoured with the simplest of spices and an authentic delicacy of Nagaland. Evolved through influences from the neighbouring states like Sikkim and Manipur, legend has it that the Nagapork came out of the Feast of Merit.

Long before tribal villages become kingdoms, the old Naga Tribes observed a community kitchen cooking called the Feast Of Merit. Every household of the tribe were mandated to give one ingredient to the community kitchen to prepare a feast for the hunters. They met in the centre of the village and ate together everyday. Run by revolutionary chefs of the day, the Nagapork is said to be a product of one of these kitchens.

The Nagapork is one of the first dishes taught to all girls and boys in every Naga home. The dish is noteworthy in the fact that smoked pork is used in the recipe and over the ages there has barely been any changes in this tribe-perfected recipe.

Khar

Khar
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Khar

Extremely popular in the eastern Indian state of Assam, the Khar is essentially a dish made form sun-dried banana skin and usually cooked with pumpkins.  It is considered that the khar cleanses the stomach and hence, the people of Assam have a tradition of consuming khar before the start of every meal.

The traditional ingredient — the kola khar is made by filtering water through the ashes of the sun-dried skin of a few varieties of banana. This is then added to the main ingredients, which may vary from pumpkins to papayas to lentils.

This is such a simple, humble dish, but it is undoubtedly a dish that the entire race of Assamese is prepared to be represented by – khar khowa asomiya ( khar eating Assamese) as they call themselves. References to it in sentences, especially outside Assam like ”I met a khar”, ”How many khars turned up?”, ”Are there any khars nearby?” are quite common.

Any Assamese meal is incomplete without the delicious Khar.