Author: IndianFB

Kashmiri Dum Aloo

Kashmiri Dum Aloo
North Indian Cuisine

Kashmiri Dum Aloo

Kashmiri cuisine tends to be heavy on meat but the Kashmiri Dum Aloo is one of the few delightfully vegetarian dishes from this northernmost state of India.

This dish is a speciality of the Kashmiri Pandits, a small minority of Hindu scholars and priests and the oldest inhabitants of the state. They usually do not use egg, chicken, garlic, onions and tomatoes in their cuisine instead opting for ingredients like yoghurt, asafetida and turmeric, not to mention the Kashmiri red chilli powder.

For this dish deep fried new potatoes are slow cooked on a low flame which allowing them to absorb the amazing flavour of their unique aromatic spice blend including cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, star anise and bay leaf. All cooked in a sauce made from yogurt and a paste of cashew-almond which give it a slight edge of nuttiness.

Jadoh

Jadoh
Eastern Indian Cuisine

Jadoh

Jadoh is a luscious pork and wild rice delicacy of the Khasi tribal people from the eastern Indian state of Meghalaya.

n Khasi language, ‘Ja’ means rice and ‘Doh’ means means meat. Most of Khasi food involve some form of meat with vegetables generally taking a back seat. The style of cooking tends to bring out the real flavour of meat.

In fact, the Jadoh barely uses any spices with just onions, ginger, chilliest and mustard oil. Traditionally the rice is soaked in pork blood and cooked with meat, but modern versions substitute the blood with pork fat.

While it might not sound like it, the Jadoh is quite unlike other rice and meat dishes. It is quite mild and leaves you feeling light in the stomach.

Kuttanadan Meen Curry

Kuttanadan Meen Curry
South Indian Cuisine

Kuttanadan Meen Curry

A staple from the southern Indian state of Kerala, this is a spicy and tangy preparation of fish which accentuates and brings together the rich flavours of coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and red pepper.

The unique taste of the kuttanadan fish curry was made possible by an assortment of ingredients brought to Kerala by traders and migrants from China and Portugal in the late 18th century. Combined with the locally available fish the dish soon spread all across Kerala.

In fact the dish is so prevalent in Kerala, there is even a saying that goes “To teach a Keralite, how to cook fish curry, is like teaching a monkey, how to climb the trees.”

This dish is also common in tody shops. These small drinking establishments serve the traditional palm toddy, with served along with tapioca with this fish curry.

Laal Maans

Laal Maans
West Indian Cuisine

Laal Maans

Laal maans is a speciality from the western Indian deserts of Rajasthan made from venison in a sauce with yogurt and the red hot Mathania chillies.

Now made in every Rajasthani home, the Laal Maans was once the privy of only kings and game hunter.s

The medieval Maharaja Sriji Of Mewar, tired of his usual roasts after a hunt, ordered the royal chefs to create something that is hot yet with a sweet after taste and succulent enough to suit the palate of a warrior.

Legend has it that the first iteration was a simple dish with flavours of just garlic and yougurt. Though it was quite interesting, the subtle curry failed to mask the gamy odour of the deer and was rejected.
After much trial and error the chefs soon realised that adding fiery red Mathania chillies hid its gamy odour and have it a deep red colour.

Thus was born the Laal Maans.

Since then it’s a dish that was created by men’s folk of Mewar, women were not allowed to cook it. Even today, Laal Maans makers are men, and that includes The present Maharaja Sriji Of Mewar who is among the last few to have mastered the traditional style of cooking the dish.

Kati Roll

Kati Roll
Indian Street Food

Kati Roll

A street-food dish originating from Kolkata, is wrap containing a filling of lamb enfolded in an Indian flatbread.

The Kathi Roll is perhaps the most famous street food item the city of Kolkata has produced. Invented in the first half of the 20th century its origins can actually be traced back to a single restaurant, known as Nizam’s.

Back then Kolkata was known as Calcutta, and was the capital of the British Empire in India. The story goes that the British did not want to eat kebabs with their hands, so someone at Nizam’s came up with the idea of roll the meat up in a paratha–a crispy, buttery unleavened flatbread–and then serve it in a paper wrapper.

The new snack quickly gained popularity among the masses.

The Kathi Roll derives its name from the practice of using bamboo skewers (kathi), instead of the common iron skewers, to make kebabs.

Samosa Chaat

Samosa Chaat
Indian Street Food

Samosa Chaat

From the 10th century Arab cookbooks to the royal palaces of medieval Delhi to the bustling streets of cosmopolitan India, the Samosa Chaat is a historical artefact — dish that provides delectable evidence that there is nothing new about the process of globalisation.

It is believed that people in the olden days would cook the mince-filled triangles over campfire and eat them as snacks during long journeys due to their convenience. From those humble beginnings the samosa was introduced to the courts of the Delhi Sultanate by Middle Eastern chefs. It wasn’t long before the samosa met another popular preparation — the chaat.

Chaat which means ‘to lick’, comes from the fact that the spices linger on your taste buds and you literally lick your fingers. The chaat is said to have been created for the Emperor Shah Jahan (the builder of the Taj Mahal) when he fell ill. His physician instructed him to strengthen his immunity by consuming food loaded with spice but light on the stomach. This simple panacea turned into an entire family of preparations due to its unique ability to combine with almost any other kind of food.

The samosa chaat is made with hot crushed samosas topped with cool yoghurt, a variety of chutneys finally chopped onions, assorted spices, and a multitude of savouries. The contrasting flavours, textures and temperatures is sensational and refreshing leaving you wanting more.

Tokri Chaat

Tokri Chaat
Indian Street Food

Tokri Chaat

It tastes sweet, sour, tangy and spicy — touching every point of your palate. This street food dish from Lucknow is loaded with an eclectic assortment of ingredients and is all served in an edible basket.

The historical Indian city of Lucknow maybe famously known as the ‘city of Nawabs’ but for food lovers, it is a paradise. You can dedicate everyday there trying a different category of food, and it wouldn’t be surprising to find the famous chaat dishes among the top in your list.The chaat dishes of Lucknow are highly acclaimed and among them the Tokri Chaat (also known as the basket chaat) is king.

As the name suggests, the chaat resembles a basket — delightfully crispy and used to plate the chaat. The chaat is made from a long list of ingredients including potato, lentils, chickpeas, sev, papdi and a range of spices, topped with yogurt, mint sauce, tamarind chutney and coriander.

An extremely indulgent and satisfying affair.

Galinha Cafreal

Galinha Cafreal
Western Indian Cuisine

Galinha Cafreal

A spicy preparation, Galina Cafreal is a popular dish from Goa made from whole chicken legs, flavoured with regional spices and herbs and shallow fried.

In Portuguese, Galinha means chicken or fowl and Cafreal is derived from the Portuguese word Cafre, meaning African Black. Extremely popular in the bars and taverns of Goa, this dish can trace its origins over 3 continents.

The dish is though to have originated in the African country of Mozambique. Sometime after the 15th century, when the Portuguese occupied the region, they adopted this dish, frango a cafrial as it was called, and modified it to suit their tastes.

Later when the Portuguese landed on the sandy shores of picturesque Goa, they brought with them African soldiers and slaves. This was when the Galina Cafreal, a favourite of both the Portuguese and the Africans, was introduced to India. Over the years, it evolved using local ingredients and became the dish Goans enjoy today.

To the Goans, “Cafreal love” is still one of the best legacies of Portuguese rule.

Potato in Bombay Duck

Potato in Bombay Duck
West Indian Cuisine

Potato in Bombay Duck

A dish with a very misleading name, the Bombay Duck is a not a bird but a fish. Native to the costal waters of Western India, the Bombay Duck, also known as Bombil or Lizard Fish is a fisherman’s favourite.

The dried salted smelly crumbly fish was held in high regard by British colonials. When rail links were first started on the Indian subcontinent, the prized fish, notorious for its sharp and pungent smell, was transported to different regions of India on trains. Since the smell of the dried fish was so overpowering, it was later consigned to the mail trains; the Bombay Daak (daak meaning mail).

‘You smell like the Bombay Daak’ was a common term in use in the days of the British Raj. Over the years the term was eventually corrupted and its present day name of Bombay Duck was born.

The Potato in Bombay Duck is a highly popular recipe using this unique dried fish.

(To be confirmed)

Bhutwa

Bhutwa
North Indian Cuisine

Bhutwa

Nestled in the foothills of the Himalayas and surrounded by lush forests on all sides, are the villages of Garhwal, where people evolved to live in harmony with the environment — a habitat to thousands different species of plants and animals.

In accordance to this unique way of life the Gharwali cuisine follows a sustainable philosophy of wasting as little as possible making sure every part of any raw material is used. Nothing embodies this philosophy more than the Bhutwa — a dish made of the internal organs and intestines of a goat.

While most cultures around the world consider the insides of an animal as taboo, some others use it in everyday food or as delicacies; the Scottish haggis for example.

To make the Bhutwa the internals of a goat are cleaned very carefully and marinated with regional spices sealed in a clay pot and immersed in sand under the hot morning sun. The dish cooks slowly through the day and is finally ready to serve by sunset.

The Bhutwa is characterised by its unique aroma and flavour imparted by the Timur pepper used in it. It is also an extremely healthy dish providing the people with protein, vitamins and iron in abundance.